Visiting The Dutch Countryside

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Dutch cuisine: 58 x Typical Dutch food to eat in The Netherlands & Amsterdam

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Are you searching for information about the Dutch cuisine? Here you will find a full list of typical Dutch food you have to try in Amsterdam, Noord- Holland and The Netherlands. Including authentic Dutch food, Dutch deep-fried snacks, Dutch pastries and sweets and plenty of more.

Dutch cuisine? Yes. While The Netherlands is not known for its tasty and traditional food, there is still a lot of typical and traditional Dutch food and snacks you have to try when you’re in The Netherlands and Amsterdam.

When you’re travelling to The Netherlands there is authentic Dutch food you should try. From regional food in The Netherlands to traditional Dutch desserts. And from traditional Dutch dishes to Dutch Indonesian food. But you will also discover the traditional Dutch dinner and Dutch street food.

In this local insider food guide of The Netherlands you will find a complete list with all traditional, typical and authentic Dutch foods you have to try when you’re travelling to The Netherlands. It’s the perfect list for any foodie that comes to The Netherlands who wants to discover the best and classic Dutch food.

In The Netherlands we have a Dutch food culture that teaches us to master snacks, cakes, candy and stamppot. In general the old, traditional Dutch food in The Netherlands is very simple. As that were the ingredients that we used to have. Our climate and soil is great for kale, potatoes, carrots, onions, etc. Those are very bland products, that fill you up and are products that are part of Dutch meals that are often eaten during the autumn/ winter period. The Dutch diet is all about vegetables, milk, cheese and a small piece of meat. Do not expect big dinners, but (especially in winter) one pan that is filled with stamppot. Of course, nowadays, with the amount of products that is imported, we can easily grab foreign products and make different dishes. Dutch traditional snacks and desserts however don’t seem to change in popularity.

Nowadays almost all tourists in The Netherlands try the famous stroopwafel and poffertjes. But besides those two tasty things, there is more delicious and traditional food to taste in The Netherlands. Even though I might be biased as a Dutchie, exploring the food culture of The Netherlands is part of travelling. The Netherlands is a multicultural country and immigrants took their food to our country.

Though I know not everyone will agree with our taste, I love to see other people try typical Dutch food. Sent videos when you try salted drop please, thank you! So let’s explore the Dutch cuisine of The Netherlands.

Regional and typical Dutch food to try in The Netherlands and Holland

1. Poffertjes

Even though I already mentioned poffertjes they are still on this list. We actually ate poffertjes as a child because they are meant for children, nonetheless, they are ridiculously tasty.

Where to get the best poffertjes in The Netherlands?

You can get the best poffertjes at Poffertjeskraam Corn. de Haan in Laren and Poffertjessalon Beekvelt which visits several fun fairs in The Netherlands including the biggest one in Tilburg.

2. Fries with mayonnaise or any other sauce

It seems that fries with mayonnaise are not very common in many other countries. But in The Netherlands, we love our fries with mayonnaise. We also have fries with peanut sauce (satesaus), or with mayonnaise, ketchup and onions. This is typical Dutch food.

Where to get the best fries in The Netherlands?

You can find many great fries all over The Netherlands, but Frietmeester in Deventer is one of the best.

3. Stroopwafel

As I mentioned before, stroopwafels are getting more recognition outside The Netherlands. But The Netherlands is the place to eat the Dutch cookies named stroopwafels. They are not waffles, but it’s a cookie with melted caramel between both sides of the cookie. And very tasty.

Where to get the best stroopwafels in The Netherlands?

Stroopwafels can be found everywhere in The Netherlands, from fresh and warm stroopwafels on markets, to the supermarkets. The best brands in supermarkets are Kanjer and the own brand of Aldi stroopwafels. You can get the best fresh stroopwafels of The Netherlands in any of the big cities, such as Amsterdam and Gouda, on markets.

4. Kroket

Of course, I cannot miss out on the kroketten. You can get your favourite Dutch fried snacks at every snack bar and Febo. A kroket is a deep-fried snack that is traditionally filled with a ragout with meat. However, nowadays there are kroketten available for vegetarians as well. It’s often eaten on a bun with mustard.

Where to get the best kroket in The Netherlands?

One of the best places for a kroket in The Netherlands is the Van Dobben lunchroom in Amsterdam. For more information have a look here.

5. Bamischijf

This is one of my favourite deep fried snacks from The Netherlands. A bamischijf is a slice of bami that is breaded and deep-fried. It’s basically a modification of the noodle dish bakmi goreng.

Where to get the best bamischijf in The Netherlands?

Go into any great snackbar and you’ll find very tasty bamischijven. For instance, Eetwinkel Polly in Bemmel is a great snackbar, or Kwalitaria Lekkerrr in Amersfoort.

6. Kaassoufle

A kaassouffle is another deep-fried snack that can be found in The Netherlands. It’s melted cheese inside a thin dough wrap, after that it’s been breaded and deep-fried.

Where to get the best kaassoufle in The Netherlands?

The same idea for the bamischijf counts for almost every other deep-fried Dutch snack in The Netherlands. Go into any great snackbar and you’ll find very tasty kaassoufles. As I said before Eetwinkel Polly in Bemmel is a great snackbar, as well as Kwalitaria Lekkerrr in Amersfoort.

7. Frikandel

A frikandel is another traditional Dutch snack and the history of this one dates back to the 17th century. Some people might say it looks like a hot dog, but it has literally nothing in common. A frikandel is the most popular deep-fried snack in The Netherlands, the kroket comes second. A frikandel is made from several kinds of meat, which is mixed together in the shape of a long sausage. More than 600 million frikandellen are made every year in The Netherlands, and we eat 37 frikandellen per capita in a year.

Where to get the best frikandel in The Netherlands?

The same idea counts for a frikandel. Go into any great snackbar and you’ll find very tasty frikandellen. As I said before Eetwinkel Polly in Bemmel is a great snackbar, as well as Kwalitaria Lekkerrr in Amersfoort.

8. Eierbal

An eierbal is a typical regional snack in the Northern part of The Netherlands. This eierbal consists of a combination of egg and ragout. After that the eierbal is deep-fried.

Where to get the best eierbal in The Netherlands?

For the best eierbal in The Netherlands, you have to visit Café De Koning in the city of Groningen.

9. Oliebol

An oliebol is a sort of dumpling that is made by using a spoon or ice cream scoop to scoop an amount of the oliebollen dough. After that, the dough is dropped into a deep fryer (of course) that is filled with hot oil. You can find oliebollen at fun fairs, markets and in outside stalls during winter time. We mostly eat oliebollen on New Year’s Eve. The history of the oliebollen dates back to centuries ago. There are even paintings dating back to the mid 17th century where you can see oliebollen.

Where to get the best oliebol in The Netherlands?

Gebakkraam Richard Voets in Tilburg and Oliebollenkraam Nico Sterrenberg in Schiedam have some of the best oliebollen in The Netherlands, but don’t be afraid to try the oliebollen from other companies.

10. Stamppot

Stamppot is a traditional Dutch dish that is eaten as the main course. Stamppot is made from a combination of potatoes that will be mashed with one or several vegetables. Often you can find that sausage is included with the stamppot. The most famous and traditional stamppot is ‘boerenkool met worst’ or ‘hutspot’. Boerenkool met worst is kale, potatoes and smoked sausage. Hutspot exists out of carrots, onions and potatoes. Other vegetables that are often used to make a stamppot are sauerkraut and endive.

Photo by Marc Gortz

Where to get the best stamppot in The Netherlands?

One of the best restaurants for a traditional Dutch food and stamppot is in Amsterdam and called Moeders.

11. Filet Americain

Dutch people love bread. And I’m one of them. What comes with our enormous love for bread is the need for thousands of different kinds of spreads. And those Dutch spreads for the bread sometimes exists out of the weirdest combinations. You name it and we have it. Filet Americain is a spread that is made from raw beef, mayonnaise and herbs. If you want to try good filet Americain you have to visit a butcher such as a Keurslager and buy it there. The stuff from the supermarkets isn’t great.

Where to get the best filet americain in The Netherlands?

Enter any butcher (slager in Dutch) and ask for filet americain. It has an orange colour.

12. Bread

Bread is a holy piece of food in The Netherlands. We eat bread for breakfast and lunch or dinner. So, when you’re in The Netherlands one thing you have to do is to go to a local bakery and buy bread, buy one of the many spreads and eat it.

Where to get the best bread in The Netherlands?

Don’t walk into a supermarket and expect to get the best bread in the world. Although the supermarket bread is okay, you’d have to visit any bakery in order to understand why we love our bread so much.

13. Cheese

The Netherlands is famous for its cheeses, with a good reason. I eat cheese almost every day. I would say that cheese is part of our culture and identity. From Edammer to Maaslander and from Beemster to regional cheeses. The flavours and textures are all so different from each other that going for a cheese tasting is the only option in The Netherlands. Not a bad option if you ask me.

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Where to get the best cheese in The Netherlands?

Don’t opt for the typical Gouda or Old Amsterdam cheese. Instead, go for the more regional cheeses. Go to the cheese markets of The Netherlands and buy fresh cheese there. For all the information of the cheese markets of The Netherlands that you should visit, click here for another article I wrote. Or visit a market or you can walk into a specialty store and buy cheese there.

14. Drop

Drop, or liquorice is a candy that many people in The Netherlands eat. In fact, we eat 32 million kilograms of liquorice each year. When it comes to foreigners it’s always a treat to let you guys try the salt liquorice. The face of yours when you scream out that this cannot be candy as it’s not even sweet is even more hilarious. But, some people actually like it. So, go to the supermarket and buy a small package of drop. There is a sweet drop, salt drop, honey drop and plenty of more.

Where to get the best drop in The Netherlands?

There are many different drop brands in The Netherlands, but Klepper & Klepper is one of the best in my opinion. You can find them in stores all over The Netherlands nowadays, such as STACH van Woustraat in Amsterdam and at Sweets & Antiques | Eten & Drinken in Alkmaar.

15. Weespermoppen

Weespermoppen is a popular Dutch cookie. The Weespermoppen is a speciality in the town called Weesp and is made from almond paste. They will land you in heaven.

Where to get the best weespermoppen in The Netherlands?

At Banketbakkerij Wesselman in Weesp.

16. Duivekater

Duivekater (literal translation dove/ pigeon hangover) is a sweet, white bread that originates from the province I’m from, Noord- Holland. It’s a flatbread and contains flour, eggs, sugar, yeast, milk and rasped lemon peel. Duivekater is a soft kind of bread with a soft brown crust and is typically eaten with butter. It was mostly eaten during celebrations around Easter and other festivities.

Where to get the best duivekater in The Netherlands?

For the best duivekater you’d have to visit Isken, De Echte Bakker in Amsterdam.

17. Zeeuwse bolus

One of my favourite things is the Zeeuwse bolus. It’s a sweet pastry that is made in the province of Zeeland. It’s white bread dough that is rolled in brown sugar, in combination with cinnamon. Every baker makes the shape of the bolus different and they are either eaten with the coffee or just as a treat. Sometimes one side of the Zeeuwe bolus is covered in butter as well.

Where to get the best Zeeuwse bolus in The Netherlands?

For the best bolus of Zeeland you’d have to go to the town of Clinge and visit Van Meijel De Echte Bakker.

18. Zeeuwse mosselen

This is another thing you must eat when you’re in The Netherlands or province of Zeeland. The Zeeuwse mussels. The mussels from the Eastern Scheldt in Zeeland, Wadden Sea, German Wadden Sea, Irish and English bays are all rinsed with the pure Eastern Scheldt water in Zeeland. And not just anywhere in Zeeland, but in its mussel capital of Yerseke. If you’re looking on where to eat Zeeuwse mussels and traditional Dutch food, then you have to visit Yerseke.

Where to get the best Zeeuwse mussels in The Netherlands?

The best mussels can be found all throughout the province, but one restaurant in particular is incredible and that is De Oesterij in the town of Yerseke. It exists more than 100 years and is one of the most popular but best restaurants in The Netherlands when it comes to mussels.

19. Domtorentje

A Domtorentje is traditional chocolate that’s a speciality from the city of Utrecht since 1922. This chocolate has the relief of the dom tower of Utrecht on top and is made from dark chocolate with a creamy chocolate filling.

Photo by Amfran26

Where to get the best domtorentje in The Netherlands?

The domtorentje can be found at Banketbakkerij Theo Blom in the city of Utrecht.

20. Limburgse vlaai

One of the typical traditional and authentic foods you have to try in Limburg and Maastricht is a Limburgse vlaai. Don’t call it a pie as it’s more of a tart. A Limburgse vlaai consists of a pastry and filling and is usually around 26-31 centimetres. The ‘standard’ vlaai was first made in Weert, therefore it’s known as the Weertervlaai.

Best vlaai of Maastricht | One day in Maastricht | 24 hours in Maastricht

Where to get the best vlaai in The Netherlands?

All throughout the province of Limburg you’ll be able to find a good vlaai, there’s even one in Maastricht that I wrote about. But one of the best bakeries to get a vlaai is Ewals, De Echte Bakker in Tegelen.

21. Indonesian

Okay, I know that Indonesian food does not originate from The Netherlands. However, we have a huge Indonesian community. So for the best Indonesian food outside of Indonesia, The Netherlands is your place to be. Anyway, a rijsttafel (rice table) is the perfect way to try out several dishes at the same time. If you’re searching for great Indonesian restaurants you have to visit large cities such as Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Utrecht and Den Haag (The Hague).

Where to get the best Indonesian food in The Netherlands?

You can find great Indonesian restaurants all throughout The Netherlands. Most of them can be found in big cities such as Utrecht, Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague. However, some can be found in small towns. One of the best Indonesian restaurants of The Netherlands can be found in The Hague. Keraton Damai is one of the best restaurants of The Hague.

22. Arnhemse meisjes

Arnhemse meisjes are traditional Dutch biscuits and literally translates to Girls from Arnhem (Arnhem is a Dutch city). The Arnhemse meisjes are crunchy, oval-shaped cookies that are sprinkled with sugar. They were first baked in 1829 by a baker called Hagdorn in Arnhem. The Arnhemse meisjes are internationally known as Arnhem biscuits.

Where to get the best Arnhemse meisjes in The Netherlands?

To get these tasty Dutch cookies you’d have to visit Banketbakker Van Asselt in Arnhem.

23. Twentse kozak

Twentse kozakken is a regional product from the area of Twente in The Netherlands. A kozak is a kind of cookie that is covered with dark chocolate glazing on the outside. The inside is filled with a cream filling or a jam-like filling and the outside of the filling is made of marzipan. The cookie is either in a rectangle or round shape.

Where to get the best kozak in The Netherlands?

One of the best places to get a Twentse kozak is at Bakkrij Schabbink in Saasveld.

24. Kosterworst

A kosterworst is a sausage that originates from the province of Drenthe. It’s a kind of hard and dries sausage, so not as easily chewable as most regular sausages in The Netherlands. Kosterworst is mostly eaten as a snack or bite next to drinks.

Where to get the best kosterworst in The Netherlands?

Go into any supermarket and search for the brand Huls and packaging Drentse kosterworst.

25. Groningse poffert

This is a typical regional product from the province of Groningen. Poffert is a regional dish that was mainly eaten by people who lived on a farm back in the days, but nowadays it’s making its way back to the mainstream. A poffert is often made from baking soda, raisins, milk, eggs and salt. But of course, the recipes tend to differ here and there. It’s kind of the same as a mix for pancakes, besides the fact that this mix needs rise for a while.

Where to get the best poffert in The Netherlands?

The best poffert of Groningen can be found at Bakkerij Jager in Grijpskerk.

26. Hagelslag

Hagelslag is one of the most famous sandwich topping that we use in The Netherlands. What is Hagelslag? They are chocolate sprinkles that we put on our bread whenever we want. The name refers to ‘hagel’ which is the Dutch word for hail. While some may say that they are ‘normal’ chocolate sprinkles like what some might put on cakes, I can assure you they are not. Hagelslag has less sugar, a better taste and more cacao than the chocolate sprinkle people from other countries put on cakes. Only hagelslag that has at least 32% cacao may be named chocolade hagelslag.

Photo by Ronald van der Graaf

Where to get the best hagelslag in The Netherlands?

Go into any supermarket and find either Venz hagelslag or De Ruijter and you’ll be absolutely loving your life.

27. Hollandse Nieuwe

If you’re looking for the most famous Dutch snacks in The Netherlands. Or the best authentic and oldest traditions when it comes to eating one specific kind of fish in The Netherlands, then this is yours.
Hollandse Nieuwe is a dish or snack that dates back to the Middle Ages. The soused herring in The Netherlands is mostly served as a snack in The Netherlands, either without or with cut onions. The herring is eaten by lifting it up by its tail and to eat upwards.

Where to get the best Hollandse Nieuwe in The Netherlands?

28. Speculaas

Speculaas is one of my favourite biscuits in The Netherlands. I favour biscuits that have cinnamon in them and speculaas is one of them. This spiced shortcrust biscuit was in the beginning mainly popular during the advent time, fun fairs, weddings and Sinterklaas. Since a few decades you can buy and eat speculaas throughout the entire year and it’s mostly eaten as a biscuit next to the coffee or tea.

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Where to get the best speculaas in The Netherlands?

29. Erwtensoep

The dish someone who’s visiting The Netherlands during winter must try is pea soup, or how we call it erwtensoep or snert. Pea soup is one of the staples of Dutch cuisine during winter. There are several ingredients in snert and everyone makes it different. However, the traditional ingredients were split peas, celeriac, leeks, carrot and onion. Nowadays many people add potatoes, this way the soup gets thicker faster. And smoked sausage is often added as well.

Where to get the best erwtensoep in The Netherlands?

30. Appelflappen

An appelflap is a pastry that is filled with fresh apples. Some add raisins or sweet currants. It’s common to have sugar or powdered sugar sprinkled on top of an appelflap. An appelflap is a triangular pastry that is when it’s home-made, made with puff pastry. In The Netherlands, we have a long and varied history of baked goods. So, if you’re looking for the best Dutch pastries, snacks or cookies then you must be loving this article.

Photo by sander_123

Where to get the best appelflap in The Netherlands?

31. Zoervleis (Limburgian) – Zuurvlees (Dutch)

If you’re in the province of Limburg in The Netherlands, then this traditional and regional dish from Limburg is a must. Zoervleis means sour meat and is a delicious dish that has some local variations. Zoervleis is made of traditionally horse meat but nowadays beef meat is used and marinated in vinegar. While you might expect the zuurvlees in Limburg to taste sour, the opposite is true. Apple syrup and Dutch gingerbread (peperkoek) are added to make the taste sweeter. Zoervleis is most often combined with fries.

Photo by serapheus

Where to get the best zoervleis in The Netherlands?

32. Hachee

Hachee is a traditional stew in The Netherlands that is usually made with diced meat or chuck roast. The typical hachee has onions, beef, clove and bay leaves. Some add vinegar or wine. It’s usually eaten with hutspot, potatoes or red cabbage.

Photo by Martijn van Exel

Where to get the best hachee in The Netherlands?

33.Vlaflip

A vlaflip is a typical dessert in The Netherlands, but not as special as you might think. We like to make interesting and sweet combinations. A vlaflip consists of vla, yoghurt and red lemonade syrup. Vla is kind of like custard, but it doesn’t taste the same. You will need to make a vlaflip in a glass and add a small layer of the red syrup. After that you will fill the first half with vla and the second half with yoghurt. Et voila!

Where to get the best vlaflip in The Netherlands?

34. Saucijzenbroodje

The saucijzenbroodje is a popular little sausage roll in The Netherlands that’s often eaten as a snack or lunch. Both sausages are prepared with minced meat.

Photo by Rene Gademann

Where to get the best saucijzenbroodje in The Netherlands?

35. Suikerbrood

Suikerbrood (literal translation sugar bread) is a yeast-based white bread that has large lumps of sugar mixed through the dough. In Frisian, it’s called sûkerbôle. Suikerbrood is one of the many variations of bread that we have in The Netherlands and is often flavoured with cinnamon. Traditionally people gave suikerbrood as a present to parents after a baby’s birth, but nowadays it’s also eaten during other celebrations and special occasions.

Photo by Mararie

Where to get the best suikerbrood in The Netherlands?

36. Tompouce/ tompoes

A tompouce is a Dutch pastry that has a thick layer of cream/custard that is placed between two thin layers of puff pastry. And on top of one of the puff pastries, you can find a layer of icing. It’s difficult to eat in a whole without not worrying the cream spats everywhere, so most people remove the top layer and save that part for last.

Photo by Rogiro

Where to get the best tompouce/ tompoes in The Netherlands?

37. Taaitaai

A taaitaai is a kind of soft and tough dough biscuit that is mostly eaten during the holiday of Sinterklaas in The Netherlands. Taaitaai literally translates to tough tough. With a good reason, it’s kind of difficult to chew them and bite through them.

Where to get the best taaitaai in The Netherlands?

38. Vla

Vla is a true piece of deliciousness and it is a Dutch dairy product that is made from fresh milk, eggs and sugar. It’s kind of like custard, but very different. The first time ‘vla’ was documented was back in the 13th century. However, at that time ‘vla’ was a word that referred to any custard-like substance that was either covering cakes or baked goods.

Photo by jksimpson

Where to get the best vla in The Netherlands?

39. Knapkoek

Knapkoek is a typical Limburgian cookie, which is made from the leftovers of dough from the ‘vlaai’ (flan). Although it’s made in Belgium Limburg and the Netherlands Limburg, it cannot miss on this list. In the Netherlands, Limburg knapkoek is made in the area between Thorn and Roermond. And you can even see how they make it in the bakery of the open air museum of Limburg: Limburgs Openluchtmuseum Eynderhoof.

Where to get the best knapkoek in The Netherlands?

40.Fryske Dumkes

The following product is again a cookie, but this time it’s Frisian food from the province of Friesland. Fryske Dumkes got their name either because of the thumb the baker pushed in the cookies (Dumke) or because of its shape. But one thing is for sure. This is one of the typical foods from Friesland you have to try. It’s a crispy Frisian cookie that has an anise flavour and hazelnuts or almonds.

Where to get the best Fryske Dumkes in The Netherlands?

41. Vockingworst

If you’re a fan of sausages, then you’ll love Vockingworst. This grey liverwurst with a very special flavour. It’s been made with a traditional family recipe for more than 125 years now.

Where to get the best vockingworst in The Netherlands?

42. Nijmeegs Marikenbrood

This is a delicacy that is from the city of Nijmegen. The name of Mariken refers to a medieval play, but the recipe of this regional food in Nijmegen is only 30 years old. The Marikenbrood translates to bread, however, it’s more of a pie and exists out of dough from a currant bun, almond paste, custard, mandarins and cinnamon sugar.

Where to get the best Marikenbrood in The Netherlands?

43. Kruidnoten

When you’re in The Netherlands a few months before and a month after the Sinterklaas holiday (early December) you can find kruidnoten in every bakery and supermarket in The Netherlands. Kruidnoten are small, round cookies that have a very crispy texture. It literally translates to spice nuts and are made of the same ingredients as speculaas, which means you cannot escape cinnamon even if you wanted to. Kruidnoten are often referred to as pepernoten, but pepernoten are something completely different in structure (they’re soft) and flavour.

Where to get the best kruidnoten in The Netherlands?

You have two changes. Either walk to the supermarket and buy the kruidnoten of the brand of Bolletje. Or you can walk into a bakery and buy them. Both taste amazing!

44. Roti (dhalpuri/ aloo puri)

Now, before someone attacks me, I do not think roti is Dutch. However, it’s a dish you have to try when you’re coming to The Netherlands because we have a big community of people from Suriname who came to The Netherlands in the 1970s. And after their emigration roti became one of the most popular take-out dishes in The Netherlands and still is. It usually includes potatoes, various vegetables, a boiled egg and chicken curry. But roti itself is the pancake.

Where to get the best roti in The Netherlands?

There are so many great places for roti in The Netherlands. The best roti of Amsterdam is Meos Colloseum which can be found at Lootstraat 5. The best roti of Rotterdam can be found at Roopram Roti and Rotiland.

45. Boterkoek

This is another traditional Dutch flat cake and translates to butter cake. It’s made of mostly butter and flour. Fun fact: not every cake that is made of main butter may be called a butter cake. Only when the cake is made with real special ‘roomboter’, it may use the name boterkoek. The boterkoek in The Netherlands is made in a special butter cake pan that is round. While this Dutch cake is made of butter and is a bit moist (sorry for the use of the word) on the inside, it does have a very nice crispy edge.

Where to get the best boterkoek in The Netherlands?

For the best boterkoek of The Netherlands you’d have to visit the  Bûterhûs (butterhome) in the town of Balk, Friesland.

46. Ontbijtkoek

Ontbijtkoek, or breakfast cake, is a Dutch spiced cake. But it’s not a normal cake that you would eat at birthdays, nor does it involve cream and icing. The most important ingredient is actually rye, which makes the cake a light brown colour it has. It’s mostly spiced with cloves, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and succade, but many regions have its own version of the ontbijtkoek. We often eat ontbijtkoek during breakfast or as a snack with a thick layer of butter on top, it’s even eaten on bread as well.

Photo by Liliana Fuchs

Where to get the best ontbijtkoek in The Netherlands?

You can walk into a bakery and find some fresh ontbijtkoek there. Or for the most popular ontbijtkoek brand you’d have to walk into a random supermarket and look for the brand of Peijnenburg.

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47. Roze koek

A roze koek is a typical Dutch cookie or pastry and translates to a pink cake. This Dutch pastry consists of a small flat cake that has a layer of pink fondant icing on top, which also explains the name ‘roze koek’.

Where to get the best roze koek in The Netherlands?

For a great roze koek, you only have to walk into a supermarket and search for the brand of Glace.

48. Kibbeling

One of my favourite Dutch snacks is the deep fried fish of Kibbeling. Kibbeling consists of battered chunks of fish (often cod) and is often served with a mayonnaise- garlic sauce called remoulade.

Where to get the best kibbeling in The Netherlands?

At Visspecialist Sluizeman in Alphen aan den Rijn, you can get some of the best kibbeling of The Netherlands. But if you’re not in the area, walk into a fish shop or to a market and you can find fresh kibbeling there as well.

49. Wentelteefjes

Wentelteefjes are similar to French toast, but we don’t add sugar to the mixture which is done in the U.S.A, Nor do we serve it with any syrup. It’s also called ‘verloren brood’, literal translation lost bread, it was previously used so that we didn’t have to throw away any old bread. The bread that is used can be anything from a baguette to a normal slice of bread. The mixture exists out of eggs and milk.

Where to get the best wentelteefjes in The Netherlands?

At The Lobby in Amsterdam which is located at the Fizeastraat you can get some of the best wentelteefjes of The Netherlands. The reason? They’re made from suikerbrood and taste insane!

50. Broeder

Broeder translated to the old fashioned way of saying brother, is a dish that is mostly eaten in the area of West- Friesland, which is where I’m from. The most important ingredients are flour, yeast and raisins. The bread mixture is traditionally put in a cotton bag which is called a broederzak, closed off and then cooked in a pot of boiling water for two hours. But nowadays it’s made in many different ways. Every region within the region of West- Friesland makes a broeder in a different way. It’s a famous dinner dish or dessert of this part of The Netherlands, although it’s nowadays only eaten for special occasions.

Where to get the best broeder in The Netherlands?

You cannot get broeder at many bakeries, but I’ve found one bakery where you can order yourself a Hoornsche broeder (a broeder from the city of Hoorn). At Bakkerij Otten in Hoorn you can order a broeder the day before you want to eat it. As broeder is not often eaten anymore, you won’t see them lying around in bakeries.

51. Appeltaart

The best traditional pie of The Netherlands must be the Dutch apple pie. The recipe for our famous Dutch apple pies go back to the Middle Ages, a recipe was found in an early Dutch cookbook from 1514. Everyone I know makes the Dutch apple pie in a different way and adds different ingredients. Apples are the one key ingredient, of course, some add almond paste, full-cream butter, raisins or sugar. Others add a lot of cinnamon (which is what we do back home). But one thing is clear, there is nothing better than a Dutch apple pie.

Where to get the best appeltaart in The Netherlands?

Most cafes offer apple pies in The Netherlands, however if you’re in Amsterdam and want to eat Dutch apple pie I recommend you to go to Koffiehuis De Hoek.

52. Beschuit (met muisjes)

Beschuit are round shaped, light rusks that are pretty crumbly. They are often eaten during breakfast or as a quick snack in-between. We often ate them with cheese or with sprinkles. However, they are most popular for celebrating the birth of a newborn. What we do is we take a ‘beschuitje’, cover it with butter and sprinkle anise seeds that are either pink or blue over them.

Where to get the best beschuit in The Netherlands?

Either walk into a random bakery or go to a supermarket and have a look for ‘bolletje’ beschuit.

53. Bitterbal

I couldn’t skip the bitterbal, now could I? This is basically a small version of a kroket. A bitterbal is a Dutch deep-fried snack that contains a thick roux of beef or veal, butter, flour, beef broth and parsley.

Where to get the best bitterbal in The Netherlands?

Some of the best bitterballen and variations of bitterballen (such as vegetarian) of The Netherlands can be found at Bar Bitterbal in Amsterdam.

54. Brabants worstenbroodje

This is a typical sausage roll from the province of Noord- Brabant which is a province in the Southern part of The Netherlands. Worstenbroodjes is one of the typical regional foods you have to try when you’re in this area of The Netherlands.

Where to get the best worstenbroodje in The Netherlands?

At Bakkerij Verba in Sleeuwijk.

55. Bossche bol

If you’re a fan of chocolate and cream, then you’re in for a treat. A Bossche bol is a sweet round pastry that is extremely popular in The Netherlands. They can be found in the city of ‘s- Hertogenbosch (Den Bosch) and are filled with cream and the outside is covered with chocolate. It’s always served with a fork and knife as there’s no normal way to eat it. Don’t worry, they include plenty of napkins as well.

 

Henk Jan van der Klis

 

Where to get the best Bossche bol in The Netherlands?

The absolute best place in The Netherlands to get a bossche bol is  Banketbakkerij Jan de Groot in Den Bosch. He sells the real deal.

56. Eierkoek

An eierkoek (egg cookie) is an airy, round shaped cookie that is mainly made of eggs and flour. They’re a golden yellow colour and have a diameter of around 10-20 cm. They’re often eaten with butter on the flat side. This cookie is a bit on the drier side, so when you try this don’t forget to grab some water as well.

Where to get the best eierkoek in The Netherlands?

Some of the best eierkoeken can be found at Banketbakkerij Lunchroom Snijers in leiden.

57. Gevulde koek

A gevulde koek is a Dutch almond cookie that is made of dough and butter but had a filling of almond paste. A gevulde koek literally means filled cookie, so the name makes sense now. This popular Dutch cookie has a diameter of around 10 cm and always has half an almond on top.

Photo by Karin Bultje

Where to get the best gevulde koek in The Netherlands?

Most bakeries have great gevulde koeken, if you’re in Amsterdam I would recommend you to visit Stach at the Nieuwe Hoogstraat for some great cookies.

58. Haagse hopjes

Haagse hopjes are Dutch sweets and candies that comes from the city of The Hague. These sweets have a slight coffee and caramel flavour and date back to the 18th century.

Where to get the best Haagse hopjes in The Netherlands

Walk into any supermarket and head to the candy department (snoep). Here you will find the Rademaker Haagse hopjes. They’re small candies that are wrapped up in a white packaging.

Discover the Netherlands and its food in this insider guide from a local. Including The Netherlands traditional food for dinners, desserts, snacks and breakfast. Find The Netherlands best food such as breads, mashed potatoes,butter cakes, sweets and pea soup. But what to think of the best food dishes in Holland, such as apple pies and chocolate sprinkles in The Netherlands. Explore Europe with the best food, such as desserts and meals to put on your bucket lists when you travel to cities.

I hope this article was very useful for you and I hope that you’ll be trying some of these typical Dutch foods from the Dutch cuisine out very soon. I’ll be updating this post as soon as I think of more things that you can all try. If you’re interested in discovering Amsterdam off the beaten path, then you’ll love this article!

Or discover Maastricht and its regional cuisine instead, which you can find here. No matter where you’ll be going in The Netherlands I’m sure you will have fun, but tulips make your time a little more colourful and fun. So here’s a perfect article to see tulip fields without the crowds in Noord- Holland. Have a lovely day and share this post!!

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Manon

Founder of Visiting The Dutch Countryside at Visiting The Dutch Countryside
Hey there! My name is Manon and I'm the founder of Visiting The Dutch Countryside, a local travel blog about The Netherlands. I also wrote the article you just read. I'm a Dutch, born and raised, travel blogger. I decided that it's time that tourists explore The Netherlands beyond the crowds and not just Amsterdam. Have fun exploring The Netherlands!
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